August 31, 2011

Devil's Trumpets and a Red Spotted Purple

Purple Swirl Daturas are blooming.






Red Spotted Purple  Limenitis arthemis sampling
where the satellite guy's truck dripped
condensation on the driveway.



Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

August 29, 2011

Butterflies and Periwinkles Persist through Dog Days

This first video features a Dogface Sulphur and then a Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly.


If you wonder what I'm saying, I was complaining about the butterflies running off when I approach with a camera. "Here she comes! they seem to say .... and they hide."

This vid is a Giant Swallowtail nectaring on Madagascar periwinkle.
They nectar on Tithonia, Lantana and Periwinkles with enthusiasm.

Periwinkles are setting abundant seeds.

Palest pink periwinkles are my favorite, here with a sprig of
Duranta hanging over.

Buffy, blending in.




Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

August 25, 2011

Here's my Hat. What a Hat!





Guess whether this is
1) My veil for when we renew our vows
2) A bug hat to keep gnats out of my eyes and ears
3) Part of my Halloween costume
4) All of the above.

My neighbor suggested 5) Proof I'm a real redneck.


I will never, ever get used to gnats. I usually tie a bandana over my ears and go out looking like I belong to the Bloods if a red one is all I can find. I saw a man on TV the other day who makes a net 'gnat hat.' I thought I could make one... cheaper than 12.95. The lady who sold me the tulle at Walmart said the one she bought in Sporting Goods had coarse mesh and let the gnats in, the tulle was what I needed. The peach ribbon is what I had. I thought I had white shoestrings but couldn't find them. The black billed cap came in the mail when Lane subscribed to 'Automobile' Magazine. I had to have something to keep the tulle from against my face.



Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

August 22, 2011

Collecting Seeds of Pride of Barbados


Last year I let most of the seed pods of Caesalpinia pulcherrima
split open. Seeds fell to the ground where they are lost forever.

Janie told me to tie a paper bag over the pods. She forgot to tell me that in case of unexpected rain to run out and grab the bag. This morning the soggy bag with seeds was hanging there.


Only one of 5 pods had not opened.
I'm drying the seeds in a colander.
I'm wondering whether I should plant them while
they are fresh?

A Pride of Barbados seedling in 2010.

When I was checking the spelling of Caesalpinia pulcherrima,
I saw seeds for sale for 40 cents each. 


Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

August 18, 2011

Perennial There, Dormant Here: Corydalis

I was just reading comments on the blog of Paul from Alabama when I noticed he told John of Mac Gardens that they say Corydalis won't grow in north Alabama.



I have a story to tell about Corydalis. Some years ago I noticed this ferny little plant growing across the highway under the power line along a fence. I tried to transplant some and naturally it died because that was during the time when I did not live here full time. There had been no more because powerful spraying takes place under power lines here to insure that nothing grows there except for pine trees which then can be topped to grow in grotesque shapes, but I digress. The Corydalis was gone forever until two years ago when I noticed fern-like foliage among the chickweed around some daffodils. Sure enough it bloomed and guess what? The blossoms were yellow.


I searched diligently for Corydalis online. With a few exceptions the consensus is that it is Native to Europe, that it likes to grow around rocks and that it may have naturalized in the U.S.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PSLU2

http://www.uvm.edu/pss/ppp/jul99per.html

Yellow Fumitory

Corydalis is a member of the Papaver Family. Doesn't look anything like a poppy.




John grows his in the shade and it lasts and blooms through the summer. Mine dies back with the daffodils, as if it was part of that show. If I could eliminate chickweed it would be a real show.


Corydalis, 2009


Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

August 09, 2011

Dog Days of August


butterflies in August from Jean Campbell on Vimeo.

Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

A good look at the front garden where the butterflies play may be seen Here.

August 04, 2011

Night Blooming Cereus

The cat and I show you a jungle cactus about to bloom.

Epiphyllum oxypetalum from Jean Campbell on Vimeo.

By midnight, the blossoms were fully open. I cut them and kept them overnight in the refrigerator
to share with friends the next day. Otherwise, they would have closed in the morning light. 






Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

August 01, 2011

Familiarity in the Garden Does not Breed Contempt

While I'm trying to stay inside instead of being out too long in the heat and sun I'm making plans for cold weather. Determined to have fragrance and blossoms year 'round, there are a few short weeks that have to be supplemented with forced bulbs. I brought out my copy of Wilson and Bell's The Fragrant Year(1967), older than many of my readers.

Amaryllis 'Exotica' 2009

Flowers have not changed; some of the names are different. Acidanthera Murieliae is now known as Gladiolus callianthus or Abyssian Gladiolus. I bought some bulbs in the spring and failed to plant them timely. They're coming up and need water. I hope to see their fragrant blooms this fall.

What I am after is to review which hyacinths, tulips and amaryllis I want to force. I am distracted by descriptions of fragrant plants, some familiar, some not. Tea olive is described as a winter window plant. Here it blooms from fall to spring outdoors except in the very harshest cold. I read of other fragrant night blooming cacti besides Epiphyllum oxypetalum which is again laden with buds here: Trichocereus candicans, Peniocereus Greggii, Nyctocereus serpintinas, Arthrocereus microsphaericus. I make a note to look at nurseries online.

I reach the chapter on indoor plants. Mid-October for hyacinths and mid-November for paperwhite narcissus to bloom in time for Christmas. I'm not in a rush for Christmas, there are Poinsettias for the Season. Bleak January needs blooms and fragrance, so any failure of blooms for Christmas will brighten January's chill.


I hurry past passages about plants I know I won't seek out. I stop when I see Asparagus species. Fragrant blooms? I didn't know that. I resolve to dig my Foxtail Ferns from the front bed and pot up before fall. I read that my potted Gardenia may bloom from January to June if I'm lucky.
Calla Lily 2009
I read on through the text, then the list of 'other plants to try' adding Zantedeschia aethiopica to my list. I've brought them to flower inside, other years.

I decide to order white, yellow and Gypsy Queen Hyacinths to force. Now the choice for Amaryllis will be between an apricot like the one I grew in 2009 or white. Maybe I'll pot up some tiny 'Canaliculatus' daffodils and some 'Princess Irene' tulips or 'De Wet' -- all of these should have been ordered last month. The last time I tried to grow tulips they were eaten by Baby Buffy just before they bloomed. Buffy is older now and better behaved. I'll put them on a high shelf just in case.

Princess Irene 2006 when I believed I could grow tulips.

Gardening should be Easy as Life.

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