September 23, 2011

Wildflowers in the Fall

A good rain two days ago brought out blossoms we had anticipated:

Agalinis is blooming in the far pasture, a single pink bloom here and there, a whole plant in bloom in the bright sunlight.

Silk Grass is blooming, yellow blossoms and silvery blue leaves.

Elephantapus had already begun, little tricorn bracts with tiny pinkish blossoms rising from large leaves flat to the ground.
There was Eupatorium, the white kind, in front of wild Lantana which is reblooming. I had not seen Boneset there before.

 New York Ironweed still has blooms.

Butterfly stragglers were everywhere. We saw a Giant Swallowtail puddling in a mudhole on the way back past the cornfield.

I did not take a camera. If the dog goes it is best if I don't stop for photos. She will jump and run at any opportunity to check out the new smells not noticed at home.

Back at home we noticed blooms forming on Gulf Muhly. I trimmed back Tithonia so as to show it off when it does bloom in a big way.

Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

September 20, 2011

Tonight's the Night: Night Blooming Cactus

I spent most of the day moving tender plants into the greenhouse, expecting cloudy days and then cooler by the weekend. The sun came out unexpectedly and I was furiously misting. Eighty seven degrees outside in the shade and 93 inside, just enough to make newly rooted pieces droop. Gingers and such just laughed.


Dark alternanthera has grown in the greenhouse
floor all sumer, now joined by pots of Colocasia,
Persian Shield and Purple Heart.

White begonias and a Bird of Paradise with a new leaf.

Two large Epiphyllum buds show promise
of bloom by midnight tonight.

It's sultry here but I don't want to get caught with my tropicals out.

Late entry near midnight:

There's a small bud for October bloom.

More pictures tomorrow.


 







Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

September 16, 2011

A Fallen Tree Equals a Good Day's Work

















Entire tree cut, moved and stacked.


Pictures and text are from the farm of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

September 14, 2011

Pods and Seeds in a Fall Harvest

Autumn is a time of Harvest. Collecting seeds for next year's flowers is one of my favorite garden activities.

Time to let some zinnia flowers mature and dry.
Tithonia heads that have dried can be snipped off and
dropped in place for next year's butterfly delights.

Gomphrena, anise hyssop, ratibida, echinacea, Madagascar
periwinkle and rudbeckia seeds are among those I'm collecting.

Datura seed pods are not yet mature.

As soon as the weather cools, seeds of larkspur, poppies of all kinds,
catchfly, sweet peas and dianthus collected last spring are ready for scattering.


Tecoma stans pods are bursting open with
seeds encased in white fluff.

Pride of Barbados seed pods are likely to pop
open and send seeds flying if not covered with a
paper bag or plucked at just the right moment of
maturity. These last two are for spring planting.

Pecans are starting to burst their hulls.


The weight of a good pecan harvest is
heavy and limbs are hanging low.


Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

September 07, 2011

The News Is Out: Bulbs

Ice Follies

We went to the City. Big Box Club had a huge display of bulbs. I tore myself away from bags of tulip bulbs and King Alfred. I could not resist a box of 30 hyacinths, 25 paperwhites in a box and a cute bag endorsed by P. Allen Smith with 10 Ice Follies, 8 Yellow Cheerfulness daffodils; 12 Dutch Iris Blue Ribbon, 8 Delft Blue Hyacinths and a dozen white Muscari botryoides Album. The bag garden has a  handdrawn plan on the back. I'll just stick them here and there.

I'm always amused that the little bags with photos on the front hold about a third of the bulbs necessary to reproduce the pictures, at best.

The paperwhites and hyacinths are for forcing. Mixed hyacinths, but all the bulbs look as if they will produce a blue or purple blossom which is fine with me. I usually divide my mixed hyacinths into groups by bulb color. The whites and yellows are pale bulbs, the reddish bulbs are pink. Blue and purple are obvious.

Amaryllis 2009

I still have to order hippeastrum. Can never make up my mind. Do I want all white this year? Peach shades? Red and darker red? Appleblossom that old standard pink?



Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

September 02, 2011

Pink Angel's Trumpet

Brugmansia blooms are not quite open, but I could not wait.



The pinks above are not yet fully open. I hope tonight
to experience the fragrance of these graceful blooms.

Growing Brugmansias is not difficult except that they take incredible patience.
It takes self-restraint not to spread them around like huge jellybeans.

Last year I took cuttings before frost. They rooted in water
and then I potted them before warm weather to have ready. 
This year I plan to dig a plant soon and pot up.
The hard part is deciding just how big a tree I can accommodate inside.
I expect that cool nights will discourage indoor bloom.

It looked as if the blooms would be yellow and
I couldn't remember last year's blooms. It takes
a few days for the blossom to grow out of the calyx.









Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean blogged on Dotty Plants Journal in hot, humid Southwest Georgia.

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